3 Myth About Introverts and Extroverts3 min read

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Thanks to Susan Cain’s Book “ Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking” more and more people are no longer afraid to come out and admit they are introverts.

People realize and they are starting to recognize that being an introvert comes with strengths, not only vulnerabilities.

However, even though more people are more open about it and despite social and professional acceptance, they are still widely misunderstood, it’s time to debunk 4 myths:

  • 1.  Introverts get energy from privately reflecting on their feelings and thoughts while Extroverts get energy from social interactions.

This is just not the case, introverts can enjoy being with other people just as much as extroverts do and also accept the level of energy in the room, extroverts do have more energy for longer conversations and are on a different energy level than introverts are but that doesn’t mean as an introvert you are not feeling as good as an extrovert, it just means that as an introvert you have a sensitivity to stimulation, and you are prone to being overstimulated by prolonged social interaction.

After a social discussion extroverts prefer to refuge into other stimulating activity’s like skiing, swimming or grabbing a Starbucks while introverts prefer to retreat to a quiet place, being just as happy to bring someone with them or just be alone.

  • 2. Extroverts are better leaders than Introverts.

Studies show that 96% of leaders report being extroverts https://hbr.org/2010/12/the-hidden-advantages-of-quiet-bosses  in a poll only 6% said being an introvert is an advantage and 65% of senior executive believe it’s a liability for leaders to be introverts

This might seem like better odds for extroverts but this is simply not true, it doesn’t matter if you’re an introvert or extrovert leader, you can do the same proper job you need to do, both are equally successful and excellent with different type of people. Extroverts tend to take the spotlight and outburst with exactment while introverts don’t, this is why it might seem like there are more and better leaders extroverts.

  • 3. Extroverts are better salespeople than introverts are.

This again it’s just a myth, and it is a good one as you would think that a salesperson needs to be enthusiastic, gregarious and assertive all the time in order to sell you something, but that is simply not true.

What we need to consider is the ambiverts in the middle of the spectrum, most people are not just introverts and extroverts but more likely ambivert.

They can be load in some situations and very quiet in other situations, and can also be in between seeking the spotlight and staying backstage. 

Looking at the data looks like ambiverts brought in more revenue than extroverts or introverts.

Ambiverts have a flexibility that neither introverts or extroverts are as they tend to go into their extreme self, extroverts being too loud and always talking being in control of the conversation while introverts don’t talk to much to pitch the sale, neither one of the methods is good.

If you find yourself in one of the extremes you can follow the advice of Dan Pink’s book.

Get in touch with your inner  ambivert.

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